It is interesting how one word – in this case “zombie” – can create a
bridge to an otherwise foreign universe, but that's how marketing
works. Thus, after reading an ad for
Fetish Apocalypse, which
included “Crazy Sexy Apocalyptic Fetish – Zombie – Sci-Fi Costume
Party in LA,” it seemed appropriate to cover the event for Horror
Works.

Though I am a geek when it comes to horror and sci-fi
entertainment, I don't believe that I have ever walked among
members of an adult, alternative community, and I rarely go to clubs.
Long ago, when I lived in Chicago, my friends and I would
periodically go to
Neo, The Dome Room (now defunct) or Exit to
dance to Industrial music and drink. However, when I moved to Los
Angeles, the clubs didn't move me. It seemed that in Chicago people
went to those places to...well...dance and drink, and in LA, people
went to clubs because they wanted to be part of a happening. Sorry,
LA, but much of what people think is culture here is predicated on
illusion, but then again, that's Entertainment.
Beyond my Chicago-snobbery, which I usually only reveal when talking about food, I have always maintained that
everyone is entitled to do what he pleases, and one person's jaded opinion about something is irrelevant to another
person's enjoyment of that thing. If an entire sub-culture is the product of advertising yet people enjoy immersing
themselves in the sub-culture, then more power to them! But, apart from the motives of the members of this group, I
am still left wondering: how much of this sub-culture is organic vs. artificial?
The blueprint for creating an event like this starts with the
advertising. The topless stormtrooper (
Star Wars variety, not Nazi,
of course) from the ad obviously appeals to a specific type of horny
person, and hoping to be around like-minded horny people is a
logical response to this image. Next, beautiful people [models] are
brought in to create the illusion that the event is worthy of attractive
women and men. Add a few vendors and some alcohol, and people
may start to pick up the beat. They dance, they drink, they
celebrate their uniqueness and pride in “the community,” they
make connections and friends and some even get laid. Thus, in the
end, the rationale behind it all doesn't matter as long as everybody
has a good time and the promoters break even or turn a profit.

It would be interesting to attend a private event with a similar theme
to determine just how deeply the patrons embrace this lifestyle
versus simply dressing up for a happening. As it was, the people in
attendance were: security guards, bartenders and bathroom
attendants; models and performers; civilians partying it up and
sleazy old men with gin on their breath and dangerously smooth
smiles. There was one instance of inappropriate behavior that
came to my attention; a guy was going around groping girls, but the
security team moved fast to eliminate this undesirable.
Adult film star Kendall Karson was one of the guest
hosts at Fetish Apocalypse.
Guests & Hosts mingle at Fetish Apocalypse.
In the end, it was both a liberating and
exploitative environment for the guests.
Everyone was safe to flaunt his or her sexual
orientation and goods (to a certain extent –
despite this being an adult event, only male
nipples were exposed while pasties covered
several sets of otherwise exposed breasts),
bohemians celebrated their freedom to violate
society's dress code and principally models
and working girls provided the quintessential
eye-candy. And as for Horror, I believe I saw
one zombie (see if you can spot him in the
video!).
Horror and science fiction fans often overlap, and elements of both
genres occasionally make their way into adult entertainment. But
what of events like this? Essentially, Fetish Apocalypse, sponsored
by
Bondage Ball and Evil Club Empire, was a club event. It was held
in the historic
Belasco Theater and featured DJs, dance floors,
stage performances and many creatively yet scantily clad ladies and
gentlemen. The performances included dancers in exotic outfits and
suspension acts & flogging of girls in their undies.
The Market and Community of Fetish Apocalypse
– an S&M relationship?
Article, Photos and Video by: Scott Feinblatt
If You Whip It, They Will Come
To see additional photos of Fetish Apocalypse, visit the Horror
Works
Facebook page.